Tag Archives: hand-made

Etsy Shop of the Week!

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Sweet Readers, it is time for the Etsy Shop of the Week!  For those of you just tuning in, this is where I highlight a shop in Etsy that catches my eye, for one that I have shopped previously that offered exceptional products, service, and personality.  

Remember, with shopping, it isn’t always about the money.   These days, money is important.  The money is huge.  Believe me, I get it.  Sometimes, it is always about the money.  I understand.  I’ve been there.  Heck, these days, I’m there, more often than not!

That said, I can buy a bar of soap on sale at the store.  I can buy a bar of soap for a buck at a Dollar Store!  But I can not buy soaps like these, anywhere.

That brings us to Heart J Creations beautiful soaps.    Jodi, the shop owner, is a wonderful person, very sweet and friendly, and  hand-processes her soaps the old-fashioned way in her little log home in upstate New York.   She also offers some very intense, lovely stained glass and agate art pieces.  About the money?  Etsy is a great place to shop when you need to save some money, and all of Jodi’s creations are very reasonably priced.  I’ll even call her soaps priced low.

And, OH!  What a soap!  I bought a bunch of them, in a variety of  types and scents.  They’re nothing short of delicious.  Want to lose weight?  Skip dessert.  Take a shower with Jodi’s soap.

Want your shop highlighted in my blog?  Send me an email and we’ll talk! schmoozelfleugen@gmail.com

New Feature! BLOG of the Week!

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Fellow yarn and garden freaks, it’s time to introduce this week’s blog of the week.  

This is a new idea, which coincides well with the, “Etsy Shop of the Week” idea.  I believe I posted that one on Tuesday..so let’s look for that on Mondays or Tuesdays, and look for cool blogs on Fridays or Saturdays.

Let’s kick off the festivities with Daniella Joe’s incredible blog.  This is one talented lady!   A true fiber artist, she is self-proclaimed as being, “not good with patterns.”  So, rather than be daunted by confusing text and convoluted graphs, she sees a need for something…and makes it up as she goes along. That stuns me to silence. What an amazing talent!

Her blog is a delight; Colorful, friendly, and endlessly informative. She gets her readers involved, always suggesting new ideas to tickle our own Muses.
Go on in and check out her pineapple doily, a work in progress. It will boggle your mind, that she made this piece up as she stitched. And, check out her magic Technicolor couch! You’ll be glad you did,

New Feature! “Etsy Shop of the Week!”

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Hi there!

I think it’s time to introduce a new feature to my little space on the web.  Let’s go shopping!

Here, I’ll post a shop in Etsy that I like, that looks like it has something for those of you out there that frequent my pages.  It might be a needlework shop, or crafts, or gardening…it’s all in the air at the moment!

For today, let’s look to my blog roll and start with my friends.  For today, let’s start with G-Ma Ellen!

Ellen’s a wonderful gal, who has a few great crochet patterns up in her shop..it looks like she sold everything else out for now!  Drop her a line and tell her it’s time to restock!

My favorite pattern from her is her Open Shell Cowl pattern. This lovely pattern is so easy and fast, and so customizable, I’ve flown through making something like six of them. I LOVE this cowl!  Isn’t this a beauty?

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I love the details.  Feminine without being too frou-frou, this can be a casual neck warmer, or made to dress up in.  It’s all in the yarn with this beautiful piece.

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Ellen also has a pattern for a delightful Wine Bottle Cozy/Caddy in a stunning yet casual shell lace, perfect for bringing a bottle of bubbly to a picnic, or for gifting a special friend with their favorite Merlot.

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I’ll bet this would even dress up a little girl’s cream soda bottle when she has her friends over for a party!

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So…for now, stop in and visit Ellen. She’s cool!

Thanks for looking! And, stay tuned…next week, along with the shop of the week, I think I’d like to start shining a sweet, bright light on some of the really awesome blogs I read all the time.

Heads up, Friends…you’re next!

Two VERY Special Crochet Hooks

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Gentle Readers, you have just got to see the newest hooks I received from Dot Dot Smile!  If you remember, this is the Etsy shop that I ordered the cool clown hook, the awesome clown cow hook, my sweet, sleepy swan hook, and the Dr. Who Tardis knitting needles, which my sister is totally enamored with.

Kellie didn’t let me down this time, either.  This time, I asked for aluminum knitting needles with little turtles on top, for my sister, and Kellie delivered.

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Aren’t they the sweetest little turtles?  She even got the flowers on their heads to match the needle color!

I also asked her to try a real challenge…and Kelli said, “Bring it on!”  Working only from pictures I sent to her, Kellie made perfect replicas of my beloved sidekicks, Chauncey and Earl.

Yes!!!  My babies are permanently mirrored in polymer clay.  The details are astounding!

The mini-boys arrived beautifully packaged, as usual…

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Even in the packages, you can see that the details are amazing.  Kellie got the colors down perfectly!

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Chauncey’s grip is fun and care free, just like Chauncey, and Earl’s grip matches all of his colors.

Now, check out the incredible details this lady laid into these art pieces…in clay!  Oh, my gosh, those perfect little toes!!!

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Sizes are clearly marked, and just as much fun as the colors…

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Lovin’ the sparkle in their tribal blings!

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Chauncey has his cable needle thing, and Earl has his mini crochet hook.  Seriously, the details are stunning.

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Kellie even got their pins!!!

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How talented do you have to be to lay a tiny safety pin into the head of a crochet hook, in clay!

Now, you ask, “How do the boys like their, “portraits?”  Well, I introduced them, and they looked at them closely.

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Then they looked at me and said,  “They’re little US-es!”

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Earl, a little wary, asked, “We can keep these?”

Chauncey, almost never wary, loudly proclaimed, “MINEMINEMINEMIIIINE!!!!!”

I, in my most indulgent voice, assured them, “Yes, Boys, you can keep them with you.”

Chauncey, who was not expecting this, said, “Really?  For really, we can keep them?”

Like I said, Chauncey is almost never wary.

The party ensued, with lots and lots of running in circles and playing face-splat, bopping up and down, singing, “We can keep them, we can keep them!” and discovering the unparalleled wonders of bubble wrap, which they’re still playing with.

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I finally got them to calm down, with the promise of wearing their new, “Mini-Us-es” for the camera..and the promise of letting them go back to the, “poppie paper.” 

And here they are, my little side kicks, with their wonderful new hooks.   They’re a portrait in polymer, lovingly crafted by an artist named, Kellie.  

ce with their portrait hooks

The boys hang out now, with the little boys riding their…er…backs?  Heads?  Whatever, they won’t part with them just yet.  I suppose I’ll actually get to crochet something with them one of these days.  

And, Miss Kellie, some day when I have monies, I’m coming in to your shop to go bananas!

 

 

 

 

 

 

This Is The Way We Felt a Hook, Felt a Hook, Felt a Hook!

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I’m baaaa-aaack!  Just like a poltergeist tangled in yards and yards of brightly colored yarns…I am back.

And I missed you!

It’s been a little weird here.  Not bad!  Just…quiet.  I’ve been busy, of course, stitching, dreaming, reading blogs, and endlessly wandering, collecting crochet patterns.  I even learned a new stitch or two, thanks to “Mikey’s” You Tube channel, and found a wealth of tutorial videos on Bob Wilson 123’s You Tube channel.

From Mikey, I learned this great “crinkle stitch,” for making a textured, dense fabric, perfect for sweaters, coats, rugs, blankets…anything you can think of.  He’s also got the tutorial video up for this stitch, for lefties!  Woo-Hoo!  We GO, Lefties!

From New Stitch a Day, I found the sweetest
single crochet stitch variation.  Very simple and basic, it adds a cool twist to our beloved, boxy single crochet.  Those of you who are just starting your grand journey into the vast and wonderful world of fiber and hook, will greatly benefit from any of these video tutorials, as will we veteran “hookers!”

I can not describe how much information I found in Bob Wilson 123’s YouTube  channel, or on their website, or Facebook page.  Not enough paper!

What’s that, Earl?  We’re not using paper? Oh.  Can I still change the color of the crayons I write the posts with? Yes???  Cool!

So, I have been doing my thing, stitching, spinning, dreaming…started the garden, finally!  LATE!  The weather isn’t the best this season, but compared to what’s been happening out West, I’ll take some Connecticut gloom.  It’s a banner year for weeds!

Among the infinite number of unfinished projects I always have going, I settled down to felt a few more of my older hooks, ones that didn’t have grips to make my fingers happy.

This time, you all get a little tutorial!

I started out with an assortment of aluminum and steel hooks.

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To keep things a little less splashy, I wrapped a piece of cardboard with plastic wrap.  And, to anchor the roving to the hook well enough to get a start, I used washable fabric glue, Aileen’s,  “OK To Wash It.”  That’s just what I had on hand.  Any washable glue will do, of course.  If all you have is Liquid Nails, go for it!  Just remember to wear gloves so the wool and glue don’t make you a new pair of unintentional fuzzy mittens.

I do not recommend the use of super glue.  You’re going to get a little glue on your fingers, and if you’re using super glue, you’re about to go through the rest of your week with a woolly crochet hook stuck to your hand.

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I put a selection of different colored roving pieces together, some dyed, some natural.  It’s way too cool to wrap your hooks in multi-colored roving, and you can even lay the wool out to make patterns!

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Now that we have the tools and the fuzzy stuff, let’s get started!  This is so easy, and so much fun, you’ll soon find yourself ransacking your hooks stash to find more hooks to felt.

I grabbed a hook, and a small patch of roving, stretching the roving out to measure it against the hook.  I wanted the felted handle to cover the hook up to the finger grip, so that I would have that finger grip, and also be able to tell what size hook I had in my hand.  After the hook was measured against the roving…and believe me, this is not an exact science…I dipped the hook into the bottle of glue, covering it up to the grip, like so…

02-light glue hook to roving

I also made a hook with a “patterned” roving patch, which requires just a little more finesse, but really comes out cool.  For this, I got my loose measurement against the roving, with the pattern side UP, then when it looked good to me, I flipped the pattern side down to do the wrapping.

03-measure hook against pattern

Once the hook is dipped, just lay it down on one edge of the roving, and start rolling.

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Roll it all up and tuck in the end, close, but not too close.  Leave a little pillow on the end.

06-rolled roving ready to felt

Now, here comes the optional part of today’s program!  Any needle felters out there?  Here’s where, if you have some needles about, you get to needle felt the hook sleeve into place, making the wet felting easier.  Of course, if you really, really go to town with the needle felting, you won’t even have to wet felt.  Your cover will be softer and looser, but perfectly usable.  This hook was needle felted into place…you know the drill…poke, poke, jab, jab, all over, again and again, stick, move, stick, jab, swear, wipe up the blood…..

Yeah, there are two types of needle felters, those who have jabbed their fingers with those deadly sharp little barbed boogers, and those who will do so eventually.

I’m a veteran.

So, anyway. this is what that blue and black hook looked like, needle felted.

07-needle felted, soft ready

It’s ready to use!  It’s softer than I want it, though, so I’m going to wet felt it, with the others.

This is important!  You have to wait a day, for the glue to dry.  Otherwise, it will wash away and your hook cover will fall off, or worse, fall apart.  So, wait a day, and come back for the rest of the tutorial.

Oh, hi!  You’re back!  So, you have your hooks, with the roving glued to the handles, all wrapped up and ready to felt.  Cool!

And that brings us to…ta-daaaah!  The sink.

Wet felting the hooks is easy, easier if you did the needle step first.  If you didn’t, just take your time.  We’ll go through the process as though you had not needle felted your hook cover, first.

You’ll need hot water, and soap.  I just use the bathroom sink, and some liquid soap that I keep there.  Fill the sink with hot water, and dunk your hook.  Make sure it gets thoroughly soaked!

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Next up, grab up some soapy stuff.  You can see in the picture that I have liquid soap, but if all you have is bar soap, then go for it!  Very gently, get up a good lather, by squishing and releasing, adding a few drops of water when you feel like it.  No heavy rubbing yet!  If you are using bar soap, you might want to let the hook soak while you get a good lather happening in your hands.

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Now, remember, at this early stage, you’re working very gently, so that the wool doesn’t pitch a fit and fall off the hook.  At this stage, I bring up a good lather, and squish it between my fingers, being careful not to rub too hard.  You do have to rub a little, to get the fibers to start blending, but…not too hard.  Just use a light touch, and some gentle squishing and patting.

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The fibers will tell you when it’s time to start putting a little more pressure into your felting.  This is where I start to dig in with my fingers a little.

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Don’t forget the end of the hook!  A little squish-and-rub there would be a great idea right about now.  You’ll probably, sooner than later, have to start pushing the fiber down onto the hook a bit.  If your hook pokes out, just pull some wool back up over the end of the hook and keep rubbing.

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Now that you’ve got some rubbing, squishing and lathering done, it’s time to rinse, and check your progress.  Rinse your hook in hot water, then switch to cold, then back to hot.  This “shocks” the fibers and helps get them to shrinky-dink around the hook.  Hot water expands the fibers, then the cold water shock makes them contract. 

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Now, for more hot soapy water.  You can see in the picture that I’m involving my whole hand, squishing and rolling the fibers, putting some pressure on the wool.

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More rinsing and checking…again, hot to cold, back to hot.  You can now roll the hook between your palms, roll it between a couple of small sheets of bubble wrap, if you have it, dig in with your knuckles, if you like,  rinse hot to cold and back again a few times to shock and check progress…

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And now, as you see, I have a finished, felted grip on my hook.  It feels wonderful in the hand!  I went a step even further with my hooks, and after I wet felted them, I rolled them up in a thick towel to get the excess water out…then popped them into the dryer.  Oh, BOY, do they make a racket!  Toss something in the dryer with them, give them something to rub up against.  The added agitation is what makes them further felt in the dryer, and when they’re done, you’ll have perfectly felted hooks to enjoy!

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This seems like a lot of writing, but don’t feel daunted.  This is not a lot of work.  This is even something that the kids can do with you!  You’ll use warm instead of hot water, but that’s okay, as long as they get the rubbing down.  Felting has a lot to do with agitation.

If your sleeve slides off your hook, like one of mine did, just dip the hook, gently slide the (DRY) sleeve back on, and use the glue that squishes out to seal the open end of the sleeve.  That’s right,  just use a finger tip to work it right into the edge of the wool.  It will disappear, and be soft, as it’s fabric glue.  Then, just put the hook aside for a day while the glue sets, and you’re all fixed!

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial…if you have questions, please feel free to leave comments, and I’ll get right to answering them, if I can.  If I can’t…I’ll Beseech The Gods of Google!

Stay tuned…next up, some VERY special crochet hooks….

MORE New Hooks!

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What’s this?  Even more new crochet hooks?  Well…these hooks are not new.  These hooks, bought however long ago, are basic aluminum hooks, sans embellishment of any sort.  They’re wonderful, balanced, smooth hooks and they really do the job.  My hands, however….

No big deal, just some arthritis, the bane of any needleworker, be it crochet, knit, embroidery or weaving.  The hands love a little grip, a little padding.  With crochet hooks, this is an easily-accomplished endeavor.  You simply add a grip to your old hooks, and give them new, ergonomic life!

I did this once before, where I added Sculpy eraser clay handles to a batch of old hooks.  They work well, and the best part about using polymer clay to form this kind of hook grip is that you can form it to your exact grip.

Now, I’m using wool.  I’ve fashioned a half dozen hooks (so far) with felted wool grips, and they are marvelous.  They’re soft, warm and supportive, and I got the wool onto the hook in just such a fashion as to be able to see what size hook I have.

No, they’re nowhere near as cool or decorative as the beauties I got from Dot Dot Smile, and I wouldn’t even attempt to do what Kelli has sent me.  Too much tiny detail!!!  For me, it’s the simple, the utilitarian.  I make them colorful…and comfortable.

To make these hooks, I measured enough roving to amply cover the end of the hook, spreading it out past the end of the hook just a little, and making a bit of a pillow around where I wanted the handle to have a grip.  The more wool you wrap around the hook, the thicker your grip..and the longer it will take to felt.  

I dragged out an old bottle of washable fabric glue,  Aleen’s, “OK To Wash It,” and smiled when I shook it and it was still good.  I simply opened up the bottle, and dipped the handle of the hook into the glue, stopping  just short of the finger grip where you can read the size of the hook.  You can dip, or apply the glue to the hook with a small brush.  

I let the excess glue run back into the bottle, then stuck the beginning end of my pre-measured length of roving into the glue.  I wound the roving around the hook, loosely shaping it into a handle. When it was suitable, all edges covered and puffy, I put it aside for 24 hours to let the glue dry.  The drying step is not optional!

Now, here’s where I got to choose, needle felted, or dry felted?  I chose both.  I needle-felted the wrapped wool into usable grips,  jabbing my needles in and out of the wool until the roving became fabric.  This needle-felted step is one that I consider optional.  If you want to do this, and you don’t have felting needles, you can easily skip this step and go right for the hot, soapy water.

My needle-felted hooks came out perfectly usable, but I wanted a denser,  smoother fabric grip.  I further felted the wool in hot, soapy water by wetting, soaping, and rubbing in between my hands, with my thumb and fore finger, with finger tips, however it worked to make the dense wool grips I now have on my hooks.  I paid special attention to the end of the hook so that it would felt properly without having the hook jab its way free of the wool.  I rinsed and rubbed, going back and forth between hot water and cold, to further shock and felt the wool, and finally wound up with these great hook grips.  If the “hook” end of the wool came unglued during the felting process, I added a tiny drop of glue and worked it in with my fingers, securing it smoothly to the hook.  

Here’s the last step I took.  I stuffed all of my wet hooks into the dryer with an old towel and let them roll around in there until they were dry.  The heat and agitation of the dryer further felted the wool handles, and they came out of the dryer ready to use.  This is a purely optional step.  You can let your hooks air dry, as I am with the last of mine right how.

One hook needed a lot of wet felting.  That was the hook that I didn’t needle felt first.  For that one, I started felting with the hot water and soap, and rather than rub right away, I squeezed and patted, squeezed and patted, until the wool told it me was okay to start rubbing.

I must have been in a hurry to have that hook, because that’s the one I started felting without waiting for the glue to dry!  Of course, if the glue is still wet, it isn’t going to stand up to hot water!  So, I carefully finished my hook, got it dry, and slipped the cover off the hook.  I re-glued the hook, and carefully slipped the cover back on.  No problems from there on!

I think they came out colorful and cool.  I know they came out soft and ergonomic, treating my poor creaky hands to a layer of comfort.  

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See that blue one in the middle?  I needed that hook!  You can see that I have a very tiny Feets started, and that hook, as I took the picture, was done with needle felting only.   It works!  I have, since, wet-felted that hook, and it is air-drying now.  (The incredibly tiny Feets got transferred to a different hook…you’ll meet him as soon as he gets stitched.)

Like these grips?  You can do this!  All you need is a little wool roving, a little fabric glue, and a little time and energy.  

Have fun!

 

 

Navajo Knitting (or Crochet) . . . Triple Strands From One Source.

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G-Ma Ellen has done it again.  Aside from going from solely being a crocheter to also being a knitter, without stabbing herself in the head with the sticks (like Moi), she has found and shared with us, something so wonderful, so delightfully educational, and so simple, I could smack myself in the head and say, “Duh!” for not having figured this out years ago.  Thank you, Ellen!  

This short video tutorial addresses knitting, but translates seamlessly to crochet.  I proved that at three o’clock this morning! (If you can’t sleep…stitch!)

Seriously, if you’re reading my pages and you haven’t gone over to see what Ellen is up to…take a short walk over and say, “Hi!”  She’s right across WordPress Street there…Yeah, that’s her house, the one with the crocheted curtains in the windows and the marshmallow trees!  She’s really cool.  You’ll like her!

Navajo Knitting (or Crochet) . . . Triple Strands From One Source..

I….Love….Etsy.

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Gentle readers, my affinity for crochet tools is still alive, fat and happy.  I found an Etsy (don’t you just adore Etsy?!?!?) shop that sells the coolest, happiest crochet hooks and knitting needles, I couldn’t leave the shop without putting in a custom order!

The name of the shop is DotDotSmile, and the owner’s name is Kelli.  Kelli sells the sweetest polymer clay-embellished knitting needles and crochet hooks, and also, hand-made knitting notions and other cool cuteness. She’s a great gal, with quite a nice array of hand-made knit and crochet tools.

You would think that the clay tops would throw off the weight or balance, but that isn’t the case.  The tools I bought feel beautiful in my hand, smooth and perfectly balanced.  I bought bamboo, so they’re also superbly light-weight and warm in the hand.

My sister is a huge, life-long Dr. Who fan, and one of her favorite things is the Tardis.  Lo and behold, Kelli has a set right there in her shop!  You know, I had to buy them.  When I got them home, they feel so good in my hand, I want to learn how to hand knit!

How cool are these sci-fi knitting gems!!!

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Now, me, I have a life-long love of all things fiber, as you know…and cows…and clowns.  I love clowns!  Apologies to those I just creeped out, but there it is.  I will be seeing Kelli for a Cow-embellished hook.  And why not?  A Clown-Cow!  It can be done, Kids.  This little guy was a custom order!

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Yes!  This is that size-G Tunisian hook I needed!  I am, of course, still using the little one I made, on another project, but I started using this the very next day after I got it in the mail.  Smoooooth and balanced, warm…everything you can want in a hook, and the Happy-Fun Factor is, shall we say…off the hook!

Of course, staying on task is a challenge now, as I have to stop frequently and gaze at my little grinning clown…

Isn’t he the bomb?!?!?!?

clown cro hook detail

Now,  you have the links, you even have a widget in my side bar!  If you’re in the market for a cool new crochet or knitting tool, stitch marker, needle threader, or cool desk goo-gaw, go see Kelli.  Turn around is fast!  You’ll have your new toy in short order.

Have some FUN today!

My New “Thing”

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You all know I have an affinity for crochet hooks, right?  I love them.  I study them, collect the new and different as much as I can, go ga-ga for vintage hooks, make Sculpey comfort handles for them, and keep my favorites (Susan Bates aluminum hooks with bamboo handles) within easy reach.

I also love, love, love anything and everything bamboo!  Smooth, warm, light, versatile and sustainable, bamboo is the way to go, from garden poles to walking sticks (made from garden poles), to paper, to yarn, and…you guessed it…to crochet hooks.

I recently got my paws on a free pattern for a great head band, which I’m working in Paton’s Silk Bamboo (there’s that amazing bamboo again), a DK weight wonder of a yarn.  It’s so soft and smooth, so light, I just love to run my fingers across the ball!  To work this yarn, though, I needed a size F or G Tunisian hook.  Not a long one, but a Tunisian, all the same.  Unfortunately, I do not have, nor could I find, that size Tunisian hook.  

BUT…I did find a sweet set of 3.75 (size F) bamboo knitting needles!

So, I got out a coping saw blade, a retractable razor box cutter tool, and some emery boards, and set to work.

My first two attempts resulted in snapping off the business end of the new hook, but I persevered, and now, after having only lost about an inch or so of length, I have a lovely, smooth size-F Tunisian hook!  It’s a shorter one,  seven inches from the tip of the hook to the end knob, perfect for a small Tunisian project like a head band.

I whittled and sanded, smoothed and formed, tore the sand paper off of the emery boards to get into the tiny inner surfaces, and the result is a smooth, warm, sassy looking hook that is a joy to work with.

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Here it is, with its knitting counterpart, which might become a hook, or might stay a knitting needle for a while.  They look nice together!

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As you can see, I didn’t lose too much length.  The hook measures 7″ from tip to knob, the needle measures 8.5 inches from tip to knob.

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It came out with a sweet in-line head!

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The depth of this hook is perfect for my DK weight yarn, and so smooth, I’m working with it without having used any sealer or wax.  

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And here’s the test…it works like a dream. No snags!

Yup…I have a new “thing…”  and a yard full of oak, tulip and magnolia sticks!

Stay tuned….

 

Another Generation of Feets Is Born! (Chapter One)

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Yes!  Gentle Readers, this post is so special, it gets chapters!  Don’t get that excited, it’s only slated for two chapters…but still, that’s pretty cool, isn’t it?  

Meet our newest little darling, “Lacie Feets!”

Lacie is special on so many levels.  For starters, she’s a miniature!  Without her feet, she measures just three quarters of an inch across.  With her feet, she sits smartly on a finger tip, and almost fits on a quarter.

She’s just a fraction of  Uncles Chauncey and Earl’s size.  Oh, yes, you caught that.  I said, “Uncle.”  You see, Lacie is not a little sister…she’s Chauncey and Earl’s niece!

Every Feets that comes off my hook gets adopted, by someone, somewhere.  Lacie was immediately adopted by another of Chauncey and Earl’s sisters, Little Feets!

Do you remember Little Feets?  She was in Silly Santa’s toy bag this past Christmas, a gift for my sister, “Ahm-Pee Memmie.”

Little Feets is all grown up and has adopted her own Feets daughter, Lacie!

Little Feets is all grown up and has adopted her own Feets daughter, Lacie!

Do you remember how small Little Feets is?  Just about the size of a golf ball, she fit handily into Santa’s toy bag.  So, it was a big surprise when I found out that B.H. Feets is not the only adult member of this family, but that Little had, with Mary’s outstanding parental care and tutelage,  grown up and was ready to adopt her own baby Feets!

All I had to do was make the doll…and get her past Chauncey and Earl.  It turned out that neither was such an easy feat!

I am “of a certain age,”  (53) and my hands are seemingly years older.  So, going into a miniature crochet project was a challenge to start with, as I’m currently working with no less than worsted weight yarn, and prefer super bulky.  My new favorite purchased yarn (my own hand spun wool yarn doesn’t fit into this) is Lion Brand Hometown  USA, a soft, silky #6 ROPE of a yarn that works up like a dream, with a size M or N hook.  That yarn even stands its own against a size P hook!

Lacie used a size B hook, and a #1 yarn, rated “very fine.”  Her hair was even finer, a lace-weight boucle, and her bow was made with a size eight pearl cotton, which is about the same weight as a size ten crochet cotton for making lace…hence her name.

I had no trouble with her head.  That worked up simply and quickly.  Without her hair and feet, Mary commented that she looked like the “Flying Brain” from some obscure fifties horror flick.

lacie and flying brain

Separated at birth????

It was her feet that kept giving me the biggest challenge.  I couldn’t get them to scale!  Her feet kept coming out twice the width of her little head.

Finally, though, Lacie was born, with gorgeous orange hair in a pony tail, wrapped in a yellow lace bow, and ready to meet her uncles.

Here she is, in all of her tiny glory!

Here she is, in all of her tiny glory!

Of course, she had to be gifted with her bling, a “closey-peen” loop and a “closey-peen” to match.  That is something that the boys insist on, unless the new Feets is slated for a small child or as a doggie toy.  Here’s how it works…if Chauncey and Earl see the black plastic safety eyes, they ask for the bling.  Lacie likes to wrap her pony tail around her feet, to keep warm…and to keep from tripping over her hair!

lacie 01

Chauncey and Earl could not believe how tiny she is.  They looked down at her…

chauncet earl look down at lacie

Then looked up at me…

"Where's the rest of her????"

“Where’s the rest of her????”

Then, moved right in to cuddle and protect their tiny niece.

chauncey earl cuddle lacie

“We’ll never let anything happen to you!”

When they finally looked back up to me, they both said,  “We can keep her.”

chauncey earl look at me we want to keep her

Uh-Oh!

Now, those of you who have been watching Chauncey and Earl for a while, know that Earl’s sensitive nature is worn on his yarn.  He’s a wee bit more conservative than Chauncey, in that he doesn’t just fly into danger without a look, for the sake of an adventure.  He follows his brother.  He absolutely idolizes Chauncey, and with good reason!

Chauncey seems to be a careless dare devil, and in some ways he is…but he does not just jump into danger, without a forward glance.  He looks, and he  quickly think things through.  Why, you ask?

 Because he knows his brother will follow him.  He will not let anything happen to his little brother.

Chauncey wears his heart in his stuffing.  You can’t always see the depth of it.  But let me tell you, folks, my little guy has a heart and a sense of family and responsibility that rivals any super-hero toy out there.  He’s the Buzz Lightyear-Winnie The Pooh-Captain America of the Feets family.

It just happens to be that the Animaniacs are his heroes.

So, I was ready when he put one of his big feets down and declared that he wanted to keep Lacie.  Here’s how it went….

“Chauncey,  Lacie has to go live with her Mommy, she wants to go live with her Mommy,” I said.

“You could be her Mommy,” he argued, ominously close to tears.

“But I’m not,”  I answered, as gently as I could.  My poor little hero’s heart was breaking.  “Lacie was born from my hook, but she has another Mommy ready to adopt her and love her.”

“Me and Earl would love her,”  he said, sniffing.  “We would!”

“Oh, Sweetheart,”  I said, now ominously close to tears, myself.  “I know you love Lacie.  I know you would take awesome care of her.  But Little Feets is her mommy, and they need to be together.”

This brought up a studious glance from Earl, who was quiet up to this point.

“Little Feets,”  Earl started, “She’s the one that went to live with Ahm-Pee Memmie, right?”

“Yes,” I answered.  Lacie is going to live with Auntie Mary and Little Feets.”

“Can we go and see her?”  Chauncey ventured.

“Of course!”  I exclaimed.  I bring you to visit with Nell and Lucky, and Scribbles, don’t I?”

“Yeaaaahhhhh…”

“And didn’t you spend a lot of time Outside last summer with Squeaky Feets and Bug, the dog?”

“Yeaaaaahhhh…”  Suddenly he brightened.  “I remember Bug, the doggie!  He carried Earl around by his head!”

“Yeah!”  Earl chimed in.  “Bug had my whole head in his mouth!  It was kinda gross, but it was fun!”

“Yes, I remember,”  I chuckled.  “I took your picture!”

“Um,”  Chauncey began,  “Can we play with Lacie until she goes to her new house?”

“You most certainly can,” I assured him.  “Relax, play, enjoy each other for a few days, and when it’s time for Lacie to go to Mary’s house, you’ll have plenty of time to say, ‘see you later.’  

“Yeah!”  Chauncey said, brightening.  “See you later is not good-bye!”

“That’s right.  It’s more like, happy trails.”

Hey!”  Chauncey said, now my bright and happy guy again, “Can we go bun-gee jumping?”

“Nooooo,”  I cautioned.  “I think Lacie is way to small just yet for that.”

“Hmmmmm….how about circles and splat?”

“Yes,” I laughed.  “You can all run around in circles and go splat.  Look at her.  It seems she’s built a nest atop Mount Earl!”

He looked, and forgot all about being sad, forgot all about being worried, and jumped in to play, because there was tiny Lacie, sitting sweetly on top of Earl’s head.

lacie on earl's head

Tell me when you want to jump down and I’ll catch you!

Stay tuned!  Next up, Lacie goes home to Mama!